Design, Food, Photography

Seattle Scene. eat. v7

This is Seattle Scene. eat. v7. Hello again.  The duo is back, myself {Stephanie} and my friend {Savanna}. Our research of the Seattle scene continues {see original blog post – Seattle scene. eat v1}. Our assignment is to try out new restaurants and see what the current and future design trends are in the Seattle market. We are looking from a designer’s point of view, but the food is a nice bonus.

Red Cow

Seattle Scene. eat v7

Famous Seattle Chef, Ethan Stowell debuted his newest restaurant Red Cow last week. Madrona, a quaint and charming neighborhood in Seattle, is the new Black and has become the talk of the town. {Savanna} and I managed to get a reservation opening weekend.  Stowell’s concept for Red Cow is Parisian-style Brassiere featuring Steak Frites.  They style of Red Cow is minimal, yet with expressions of exposed concrete walls, black bentwood chairs, dark leather banquettes and zinc topped tables and Stowell’s signature open kitchen.

Seattle Scene. eat. v7
One of the first few tables to arrive at 5pm.
 Seattle Scene. eat. v7
20 mins later, the Restaurant filled up.
Seattle Scene. eat. v7
We started with French bubbles.
Seattle Scene. eat. v7
We decided to share the Baby Beet Salad, Braised Short Ribs, and Braised Kale with bacon and shallots.

Seattle Scene. eat. v7

Until Next time. xoxo

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Food, Photography, Seattle

Seattle Scene. eat. v5

This is Seattle Scene. eat. v5. Hello again.  The duo is back, myself {Stephanie} and my friend {Savanna}. Our research of the Seattle scene continues {see original blog post – Seattle Sceene. eat v1}. Our assignment is to try out new restaurants and see what the current and future design trends are in the Seattle market. We are looking from a designer’s point of view, but the food is a nice bonus.

Bar Sajor

Seattle Scene. Bar Sajor

Bar SajorPronounce {Sigh-YOUR}. The restaurant located on the corner of Occidental and Jackson opened it’s doors Spring 2013. Matt Dillon, chef/owner named his restaurant “Sajor”, which was his mother’s maiden name. Dillon, one of the top Seattle Chefs also owns Sitka & Spruce, Bar Ferd’nand, and The Corson Building. He has been named Food & Wine’s 10 best Chefs in 2007 and James Beard best Chef in 2012.  Last Friday we retreated to Seattle’s Pioneer Square and dined at Sajor where we felt we were dining in another city…

Seattle Scene. Bar Sajor

Seattle Scene. Bar Sajor

Seattle Scene. Bar Sajor

There is something about white interior that we absolutely adore. White interior in combination with rustic wood; it makes you feel like you are not in Seattle and taken away to Europe. We loved the variety of seating and seeing the dining space of the second floor.  A big attraction is the open kitchen where you can see the meals cooked by wood flame. There is a balance of the rustic with the natural wood and the decor of glass containers filled with fruit and vegetables and a glitzy quality with the subtle touches of glamour. Local Seattle company, Codor Design designed the wall installations.

Seattle Scene. Bar SajorSeattle Scene. Bar Sajor

Matt Dillon knows the formula how people like to dine: casual, communal, seasonal and with a romantic touch.  The dining space sits 40-50 guests that is both romantic and informal. The large windows brighten the space during the day, while at night the space is illuminated with soft lighting for intimate dining. It’s beautiful.

What did we eat?….

Seattle Scene. Bar Sajor

Seattle Scene. Bar Sajor

We started with a cheese plate {not pictured} followed by a beet salad with prosciutto, and  by Black Cod with Asian pear for our main course. We love to share plates, that’s how we roll. Delicious.

Lastly, we forgot to check for purse hooks. We hope Matt Dillon didn’t disappoint. Until next time…xoxo SADV

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Design, Food, Interiors, Seattle

Seattle Scene. eat. v4

Hello again. We are back for our 4th installment of Seattle Scene. eat. v4. Myself {Stephanie} and guest blogger {Savanna} try a new Seattle hot spot for our reoccuring feature – the Seattle Scene. At the firm that we both work at, we are part of a team that researches/markets Hospitality {restaurants, hotels, spas}. Our assignment is to try out new restaurants and see what the current and future design trends are in the Seattle market {see last blog post – Seattle Scene. eat v3}. We are looking from a designer’s point of view, but the food is a nice bonus. Last Saturday we ventured to Ballard and experienced Barnacle.

Barnacle

Seattle Scene. eat. v4

Renee Erikson, a local Seattle chef opened her 4th restaurant Barnacle last month.  Erickson is the chef and co-owner of The Whale Wins, The Walrus and the Carpenter, and Boat Street Cafe. On top of that she also owns a food truck the Narwal.  The much anticipated Barnacle opened it’s doors in September and is located next to the Walrus and the Carpenter. Barnacle is an adjacent bar with that is no larger than 800 square feet. Within this small space you will find, a bar with a dozen stools, one booth, a standing bar, and no kitchen.  Cozy.  {Savanna} and I managed to get seats in the middle of the bar and we were able to take it in and see everything.

We wanted to mix it up a bit this round and share our experience of Barnacle via video.  Considering the small space, we found it challenging to take out the nice camera and snap photos. We spontaneously decided to prop the iPhone up on top of a water glass and film our visual point of view…

We definitely enjoyed our experience at Barnacle.  Erickson’s restaurants have the common denominator of light interiors with an open kitchen/bar.  You even feel that you are taken away to a new city; we felt that we were in a new place like San Francisco. The interior design of the space has a casual vibe and an authentic experience. We loved the details of the space and the employees even matched the space. Of course we also looked for purse hooks and of course we found them. It’s very important to girls.

SADV and Savanna

Until next time…xoxo

{Film by SADV + images via Eater}

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Food, Photography, Portland

Portland Scene. eat. v1

Hello. For those that don’t know, my friend {Savanna} and I have a little Hospitality Research project that we have been working on for a month and will continue to do so this year.  Our project is mostly focused in Seattle, but sometimes we like to add other cities to the mix.  Our assignment is to try out new restaurants and see what the current and future design trends are. Last Saturday, we ventured down to Portland – one of our favorite cities.  Please note this is not a “Foodie Blog”. Our objective is to give design facts of the who, what, where, when & why. We would like to welcome you to our first Portland “segment” – Portland Scene. eat v1.

 

Grain & Gristle

Grain & Gristle

You will find Grain & Gristle in the NE Prescott area of Portland.  We wanted to try a new neighborhood, well new to us and try a new place for our first stop in Portland. {Savanna} and I  went to Portland for MusicFest NW to see The Head and the Heart. Boutique shopping and Portland brunch was a bonus.  We leaned on the recommendation of Eater’s PDX edition and try one of the Eater 38 Restaurants.  Eater 38 is a list of hot restaurants that Eater online puts out every couple months. Grain & Gristle was on the list. Owners Alex Ganum, Ben Meyer, and Marcus Hoover opened Grain & Gristle in 2011 with the hopes in  opening a comfortable neighborhood restaurant. We saw the website and the interior space of the restaurant appealed to us. The images showed a very relaxed, modern rustic setting. From that, we made our decision.

Grain & GristleGrain & Gristle

We walked into the space and immediately felt a relaxed comfortable vibe.  The restaurant was not busy because we came at an odd time – 2pm.  What did we see and what were our thoughts?  We saw a cabin like rustic feel with cage lamps, Edison light bulb fixtures, mason jars, & Wine bottle water jars.  All very popular trends right now.  The U-shaped maple bar with a live-edge detail is the focus of the space and allows for that casual socializing. Wall to wall wood plank booths flank both sides with mix and match wooden chairs, but all unified with a rustic look and feel. The website did show exposed beams which definitely adds great character to the space. On Saturday we noticed the beams were covered.

Grain & GritleGrain & GristleGrain & Gristle

As we know, Portland takes brunch very seriously.  The reputation and or trend is definitely farm to table. All local high quality ingredients with a German flair.  This place is definitely known for their beer selection.  No beer for us that day though. What did we order?  Cucumbers, beets, summer berries, chevre, mint and 2 Sunny Side up Eggs for Savanna and I ordered B.E.L.T on brioche with potato terrine.  Absolutely delicious. For me personally, the B.E.L.T- was cooked to perfection and one of the best I have ever had.

Grain & Gristle

Our Portland trip was short, but sweet. We definitely will be there again in no time. We love our assignments of discovering the new and up-and-coming restaurants and exploring restaurants that have been around and been able to hold their own.  Keep Portland weird. Until next time.

ps.  Pursehooks? Yes.

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